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Doctor of Business Administration (DBA)

DBA Course Syllabus

Philosophy of Science

Introduction

Philosophy of science is concerned with a study of both the nature and methodology of science in general and the conceptual and philosophical foundations of a particular field within science. The aim of the course is to introduce to the student these perspectives in philosophy of science. The general philosophical aspects of the course shall address fundamental epistemological issues while the second perspective will focus specifically on research issues within the field of business administration and management. This course will provide a philosophical examination of some of the conceptual foundations of modern science. Different understandings of scientific explanation will be explored following which we will take an in-depth look at some of the major shifts of paradigm that are referred to as scientific revolutions.

Learning goals

To introduce the student to the basic philosophical foundation upon which a better understanding of scientific enquiry can be gained. To identify and examine some of the most central themes and issues in philosophy of science. Specific issues addressed will include the demarcation of science and pseudo-science, the nature of scientific reasoning, the formation, structure and explanatory role of scientific theories, etc. Particular attention will be given to the issues of how philosophers define problems, form questions and pose arguments regarding modern science.

Learning objectives

By the end of the course the student will be able to:

  • Have a better understanding of scientific methods and paradigm shifts
  • Attain a working understanding of the different philosophical positions that have been taken over time
  • Have a better understanding of these issues and their relevance for scientific research in the field of business administration and management
  • Have a solid foundation upon which to pursue research in his/her chosen area within the field of business administration and management

Expectation

Active participation is obligatory and constitutes part of the continuous assessment process in the course

Grading

Assessment will be by way of active participation, analysis of reading material, exercises, and an end of course individual exam.

Class schedule

The course will be conducted face-to-face in a class room for a total of 20 hours. A schedule of the specific topics to be addressed will be distributed to participants at the beginning of the course. Students are expected to put in at least 1.5 hours of preparatory work for every 1 hour of interaction with the course instructor.

References

  • Zucker, A. (ed), Introduction to the Philosophy of Science, Prentice Hall, 1996, (ot later edition),
  • Curd, M. and Cover, J.A., Philosophy of Science: The Central Issues, W.W. Norton & Company, London, 1998 (or later edition),
  • Kuhn, T., The Structure of Scientific Revolutions, University of Chicago Press, 1962, 1970, 1996 (or later edition).

Qualitative Research Methodology

Introduction

This course will introduce the student to the characteristics and various approaches to designing and conducting qualitative research projects in the field of business administration and management. Students will be exposed to the various qualitative methods and techniques of research in social sciences thus providing them with a scientific basis for undertaking a research project related to their area of interest.

Learning goals

To enable the student become thoroughly familiar with the qualitative methods and techniques used in social sciences research (including the field of business administration and management). The course will teach the student how to design and carry out qualitative research through practical hands-on experience.

Learning objectives

By the end of the course the student will be able to:

  • Become familiar with the characteristics, language and logic of qualitative research methods
  • Understand the available techniques for qualitative data analysis
  • Recognize and assess quality and rigor in evaluating a qualitative research study
  • Formulate grounded hypotheses for later quantitative investigation
  • Explain and interpret the meanings, assumptions, and context of the results of a qualitative research undertaking.

Expectation

Active participation is obligatory and constitutes part of the assessment process in the course.

Grading

Continuous assessment based on active course participation, exercises, on-time preparation and submission of class work, and an individual end of course exam.

Class schedule

The course will be conducted face-to-face in a class room for a total of 20 hours. A schedule of the specific topics to be addressed will be distributed to participants at the beginning of the course. Students are expected to put in at least 1.5 hours of preparatory work for 1 hour of interaction with the course instructor.

References

  • Denzin, N. K. & Lincoln, Y. S., (eds.), The SAGE Handbook of Qualitative Research, Sage Publications, 2005
  • Creswell, J. W. Qualitative Inquiry and Research Design: Choosing Among Five Traditions. Sage Publications, 1997.
  • Morse, J. M. (ed). Critical issues in qualitative research methods, Sage Publications, 1993.

Quantitative Research Methodology

Introduction

The course provides a basic introduction to the statistical methods used in social sciences research (including the field of business administration and management). The student will be introduced to the basic methods of empirical enquiry in these fields The skills thus acquired will enable the student become more sophisticated in utilizing these techniques in his/her doctoral thesis research

Learning goals

To provide the student with the theoretical and methodological foundation for successfully completing a piece of research undertaking utilizing quantitative techniques and methods.

Learning objectives

By the conclusion of the course the student will be able to

  • Successfully carry out a piece of research undertaking in the filed of management utilizing quantitative methods,
  • Identify differences between descriptive statistics
  • Identify differences between variables
  • Compute and interpret measures of explained variables
  • Understand sampling distribution
  • Use sampling distribution of the difference between two sample means
  • Interpret the results in terms of the hypothesis being tested
  • Write, present, and successfully defend a DBA thesis in his/her chosen area of interest.

Expectation

Active participation is obligatory and constitutes part of the assessment process in the course.

Class schedule

The course will be conducted face-to-face in class for a total of 20 hours. A schedule of the specific topics to be addressed will be distributed to participants at the beginning of the course. Students are expected to put in at least 1.5 hours of preparatory work for 1 hour of interaction with the course instructor.

References

  • Lancaster, G., Research Methods in Management: A Concise Introduction to research in Management and Business Consultancy, Butterwoth-Heinemann, London, 2004.

Management of Innovation and Change

Introduction

Managers must have a deep understanding of how innovation works, and how people interact with changed circumstances. Implementation of new ideas, new strategies and new technology is one of the most complex of any organization’s tasks. This course introduces the student to the perspective of innovation and change in the organization. It highlights the tools and techniques necessary to ensure success when bringing new processes and different strategies into an organization. The course aims to examine these processes within large and small businesses across all sectors in order to understand the essential features of the management of innovation and change

Learning goals
To enable the student:

  • Developing a more creative attitude in themselves and others that is useful in an organization;
  • Examine the nature and role of innovation and change in the management of organizations in the profit and not-for-profit sectors of the economy and other types of organizations in the twenty-first century;
  • Improve his/her own and others’ capacity to respond practically and creatively to problems and opportunities;
  • Learn a variety of approaches designed to develop ideas, manage innovation and transfer knowledge (including scanning the environment, changing structures, improving systems and involving people);
  • Help establish an organisational climate in which creativity, entrepreneurship and innovation can grow;
  • Understand a variety of approaches to restructuring organizations (including the learning organization, the use of partnership, networks and self-organization);
  • Better appreciate the contextual nature of knowledge.

Learning objectives

At the end of the course the student should be able to:

  • Understand the different ways innovation activities have been organized by firms and how these ways of organizing have changed over the last decades
  • Have a broad comprehension of concepts and theories for understanding and analyzing change and innovation;
  • Identify and critically reflect on key managerial issues and trade-offs in organizing for innovation and change;
  • Discuss and propose alternative ways of organizing to encourage innovation, creativity and change in organizations
  • the principles underlying creative thinking and problem-solving in the organization;
  • Use a range of tools, procedures and behaviours as aids to problem-solving, creative change and the management of innovation;
  • Appreciate the impact of information and communication technologies on problem-solving, data access and networking;

Expectation

Students will be expected to present cases and produce written work at regular intervals throughout the course

Class schedule

The course will be conducted face-to-face in class for a total of 10 hours. A schedule of the specific topics to be addressed will be distributed to participants at the beginning of the course. Students are expected to put in at least 1.5 hours of preparatory work for 1 hour of interaction with the course instructor.

References

  • Galavan, R., Murry, J, and Markides, C (eds), Strategy, Innovation, and Change: Challenges for Management, Oxford University press, 2008.

Finance

Introduction

In this course you will be introduced to, and gain an in-depth understanding of, the latest standards of financial analysis and reporting methods as they apply in a global market environment. The course is delivered through a carefully judged blend of practice, theory and case-based learning. Six core modules provide a through grounding in the field of international, organizational finance including subject matter that covers all current trends and issues on the subject.

Learning goals

  • Introduce to the student financial management theories, terminology, concepts, problem-solving and techniques used in modern accounting and finance
  • Enable the students have a clear understanding of financial statements, capital budgeting, working capital management, long-term debts, and capital funding.
  • Provide the students with the analytical tools and techniques used in financial accounting as applied to complex business situations.
  • The course addresses contemporary issues in management accounting, financial management and organisational control
  • Financial controls in internet-based firms and management accounting in the digital economy
  • Performance measurement and incentive systems

Learning objectives

Upon completion of the student will have a substantial knowledge of managerial, intermediate and cost accounting as well as corporate finance and capital markets, along with the skills necessary to deploy that knowledge. You will also be familiar with contemporary and salient aspects of international fiancé such as reporting, ethics and analysis. You will be able to analyze financial statements

Expectation

Students will be expected to present cases and produce written work at regular intervals throughout the course. Case studies will be used extensively.

Class schedule

The course will be conducted face-to-face in class for a total of 30 hours. A schedule of the specific topics to be addressed will be distributed to participants at the beginning of the course. Students are expected to put in at least 1.5 hours of preparatory work for 1 hour of interaction with the course instructor.

References

  • Williams, J., et al, Financial and Managerial Accounting, McGraw-Hill/Inwin, 2009
    Ross, S.A., Corporate Finance: Core Principles and Applications, McGraw-Hill, 2009

Marketing in the Information Age

Introduction

The advent of modern information technology (IT) has brought about revolutionary changes in the way businesses are run today. In the field of marketing the influence of IT has included the way in which marketing information is collected, structured and disseminated in a way that allows effective marketing strategies to be executed. The course is structured in a way that responds precisely to the changing dynamics of global marketing in the information age. The course will also focus on the alignment of the company’s international marketing strategy and its information technology strategy in order to maximize its Organizational Learning and Knowledge Management abilities in the global market environment for competitive advantage

Learning goals

  • Introduce to the student the concepts, theories, and models necessary for a proper understanding of the dynamics of marketing in the information age;
  • Familiarize the students with the changing dynamics of marketing in today global marketplace;
  • Provides participants with the tools, applications, and frameworks necessary for successful marketing of products and services in today’s highly competitive and dynamic information age;.
  • Address specific issues related to proven approaches utilizing modern IT methods that have significantly impacted marketing strategy and management in the information age;
  • To enable the student have a better understanding of the impact of modern information and communication technology on marketing theory and practice
  • Enable the student to formulate and implement an effective marketing strategy in a global marketing environment dominated by modern information and communication technology.

Learning objectives

At the end of the course the students will be able to:

  • Properly assimilate concepts, theories and models necessary for an understanding of the dynamics of marketing in the information age;
  • Become familiar with the parameters determining an effective global marketing strategy in the information age;
  • Design and implement marketing strategies of an organization operating in a competitive global marketplace;
  • Apply the knowledge gained from the course in better enhancing the overall competitive position of an organization in the global marketplace.

Expectation

The course will be conducted face-to-face in class for a total of 10 hours. A schedule of the specific topics to be addressed will be distributed to participants at the beginning of the course. Students are expected to put in at least 1.5 hours of preparatory work for 1 hour of interaction with the course instructor.

References

  • Daniel, E. et al, Marketing in the Digital Age, Pearson Education, London, 2001;
  • Schneider, G., Electronic Commerce, Thompson Course Technology, 2002;
  • Postman, P. The Marketing Era: Marketing to the Imagination in a Technology-Driven World, McGraw-Hill, N.Y. 1998.
  • – Cateora, P. R. and Ghauri, P.N., International Marketing: European Edition, McGraw-Hill (latest edition)

Strategic Management
Introduction

The basic principle and practice of Strategic Management are addressed in this course. The focus is on the firm, its industry and competitive environment, its long-term direction and strategy, its resources and capabilities, and its prospects for success. The basic concepts and tools of strategic analysis are presented in an integrated approach and applied to real business context. Topics covered include: the concept of corporate strategy, industry analysis, firm analysis, the nature and sources of competitive advantage, corporate strategy, global strategies and the multinational corporation.

Learning goals

  • To develop the knowledge and skills necessary to effectively formulate and implement strategy;
  • To develop strategic thinking by equiping the students with the concepts, models and tools of strategic analysis;
  • To apply the concepts of strategic analysis in complex business environments through.developing the communication, problem solving and presentation skills of the student
  • To have a deeper understanding of the current business environment characterising the beginning of 21st century

Learning objectives

To ensure a good level of familiarity with the concepts, skills and tools that will enable you to:

  • Analyse corporate situations from a global, cross-functional perspective: diagnosis of competitive and industry environments, organisational structure and operations, strategic resources, strength of strategic positioning, etc;
  • Formulate a medium-term development strategy: selection of a growth-rate, which activities to focus on, which core-competencies and strategic resources to earmark for investment, how to enter new markets / activities and access complementary competencies and resources…) and recommend improvements to operations and the organisation structure of the company ;
  • Plan, organise and quantify the implementation of the selected strategy.

Expectation

Obligatory active participation in the course which shall constitute part of the assessment process

Pedagogical methods

The course is delivered through a combination of lectures, case preparation and presentation, exercises and other forms of individual work.

  • Students should read the distributed articles individually
  • Students will prepare and present case material to be distributed by the course instructor

More specifically, they are expected to provide additional contribution to the case material by making use of the concepts learned during the lectures, and by reading recent material / or relevant articles.

Class schedule

The course will be conducted face-to-face in class for a total of 10 hours. A schedule of the specific topics to be addressed will be distributed to participants at the beginning of the course. Students are expected to put in at least 1.5 hours of preparatory work for 1 hour of interaction with the course instructor.

References

  • David, F.R., Strategic Management: Concepts and Cases, 11th ed., Prentice-hall, 2007.

Entrepreneurship

This course allows students to understand the process of turning an idea into a business reality. It will focus on the execution of the entrepreneurial process. Students will learn to explore ideas and the value of picking a practical winning idea and how to make effective presentations to capture investor interests. The process will include building partners, employees and investors and how to manage the growth of the business. Product and service development through operations and marketing efforts will be examined. Techniques to manage the budget to allow for this process will be covered as well. This module will highlight practical applications in the context of today’s dynamic and turbulent business world. Focus will be on how new business ideas are developed and implemented, stimulated by the opportunities and challenges brought about by globalization, liberalization and technology. The understanding of the entrepreneurial process requires a change in paradigm that looks into the changing rules of competition giving rise to new and contemporary business models. Discussions will include related ethical, international and legal issues on how to fundamentally start a viable business.

References

  • Kuratko, D.F. & Hodgetts, R.M., Entrepreneurship, 7th edition, Thompson, South-Western, 2007
  • Hisrich, R.D. & Peters, M.P., Entrepreneurship, 5th edition, McGraw-Hill, Irwin, 2002

Information Systems Management

The course examines the current techniques and practice of effective use of information systems in an organization and its impact on business strategy. Analysis of emerging technologies with application to business processes is thoroughly examined. The course also examines the role of management in effectively implementing an information systems strategy in the organization. The course reviews the range and impact of information systems and technology organizations use in designing and implementing their global business strategies. Integration of information systems with business strategy, personnel, and organizational considerations are all addressed in the course. At the end of the course the student should be able to effectively utilize modern information systems and technology in designing and implementing a global business strategy for the organization.

References

  • Hill, C.W. & Jones, G.R., Essentials of Strategic Management, Houghton-Mifflin, N.Y., 2008

Supply Chain Management

The course addresses the strategic aspects of supply chain management with a particular focus on the global business environment. Topics covered include: approaches to strategic management, relationship between corporate strategy and purchasing and supply chain management strategy, strategic management of quality and materials flow, strategic management of costs and added value, strategic management of supplier relationships, developments in strategic purchasing and supply chain management practices in global business.

References

  • Simchi-Levi, D., et al, Designing and Managing the Supply Chain: Concepts, Strategies, and Test Studies, 3rd edition, Mcgraw-Hill, N.Y., 2007
  • Chopra, S. & Meinal, P., Supply Chain Management, 3rd edition, Pearson, Prentice hall, N.Y., 2006

Human Resources Management

To be announced

Thesis Work and Supervision

Following successful completion of the course component of the program students will focus their full attention on research leading to the CASS Europe DBA thesis. It is highly recommended that the research topic be chosen by the student and approved by CASS well in advance of completion of the course component of the program. Each student will be assigned a thesis supervisor who will guide him/her through the research process. Program participants are encouraged to choose a topic from their area of responsibility in an organization (or an area they wish to focus upon in their career path) for the DBA thesis. The thesis, comprising 35 000 to 40 000 words, and embodying the result of an original investigation must be submitted and orally defended in front of a panel of experts comprising the faculty of CASS and its partner universities.