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The CASS Europe Master of Business Administration (MBA) Program

MBA Course Description

Marketing Management
The module introduces the basic concepts and practices of modern marketing as applied in a wide variety of settings, including: product and service firms, consumer and business markets, profit and non-profit organizations, domestic, international, and global firms, as well as small, medium sized, and large businesses. A practical and managerial approach to marketing is adopted throughout the course. Cases are used throughout the module in order to illustrate managerial relevance. Topics covered include: the nature of marketing, the environment of marketing; marketing, understanding the relation between marketing and strategy, society and ethical behavior, marketing strategy, global competition and international marketing strategy, consumer behavior, industrial purchasing and buyer behavior, market segmentation, targeting, and positioning strategies, market communication and promotion strategy.

References:
P. Kotler, Marketing Management, 13th ed. Pearson Publications

Intercultural Management
The course is aimed at stimulating the intercultural sensitivity, understanding and managing cultural differences in international business. The following topics will be addressed: principles of cultures and mentalities, fundamental elements of intercultural management, working in an international context, getting to know international cultures.

References:
Jacob, N., Intercultural Management, Kogan Page, London, 2003

Managerial Economics
The module is designed to integrate economic theory and management science so as to provide a practical approach to management decision-making in both the private and public sectors of the economy. The module allows the student, the future manager, to be acquainted with the basic concepts of economic thinking while at the same time providing him/her with a practical approach to management decision-making. Topics covered include: the methodology of economic analysis, the nature of managerial economics and behavior of the firm, optimization techniques in the decision environment, demand, production and cost, profit planning and control, output and price decisions in different market structures, and the economic role of government.

References:
Sloman, J., Economics, 6th. edition, Pearson Education, France, 2008
Mansfield, W.B. Allen, N.A. Doherty, K. Weigelt, W.W., Managerial Economics, Norton & Company, Fifth Edition, 2002.
Png, D. Lehman, Managerial Economics, 3rd. Edition, Blackwell Publishers, 2007

Accounting and Finance
In this course you will be introduced to and gain an in-depth understanding of, the latest standards of accounting analysis and reporting methods as they apply in a global market environment. The course is delivered through a carefully judged blend of practice, theory and case-based learning. Six core modules provide a through grounding in the field of international, organizational finance including subject matter that covers all current trends and issues in the subject. The goal is to:

  • Introduce to the students financial management theories, terminology, concepts, problem-solving and techniques used in modern accounting and finance
  • Enable students have a clear understanding of financial statements, capital budgeting, working capital management, long-term debts, and capital funding.
  • Provide students with the analytical tools and techniques used in financial accounting as applied to complex business situations.
  • The course addresses contemporary issues in management accounting, financial management and organisational control
  • Financial controls in internet-based firms and management accounting in the digital economy
  • Performance measurement and incentive systems

References
Bhimani, A., Management Accounting in the Digital Economy, OUP (2003); Contemporary Issues in Management Accounting, OUP (2006);
Olson, O., Guthrie, J, & Humphrey, C., (Eds), Global Warning: Debating International Developments in New Public Financial Management, Cappelan Akademisk Forlag As, Oslo (1998);
Merchant, K., & W Van der Stede, Management Control Systems: Performance Measurement, Evaluation and Incentives, FT/Prentice Hall (2007).

Organizational Behavior
The aim of the course is to help the student develop an integrated approach to organization. A related, and equally important, objective is to help students think logically and clearly about problems of organization and strategic change, and to develop their ability to constantly improve their skills as a consequence of accumulated experience. At the end of this course it is expected that every student will be able to function at the leading edge of practice in organization design. The course is organized into three segments covering: fundamental perspectives on organizational design, managing change in organizational design, future forms, current issues and applications.

References:
Griffin, R.W., and Moorhead, G., Organizational Behavior, South-Western Cencage Learning, 10th edition, 2008

Human Resources Management
The overall goal of this module is to prepare the manager to utilize the human assets of the organization in a manner that maximizes his/her contributions to organizational performance. Emphasis will be placed on understanding differences and similarities of individuals and a variety of groups, with careful examination of individual and group values, attitudes, and behaviors. Equipped with this understanding, the manager should be able to operate comfortably and successfully in today’s complex workplace. Emphasis will be placed on the international and multicultural dimensions of HRM.

References:
Briscoe, D., Schuler, R.S., Claus, L., International Human Resources Management, Routledge, 2009.

Operations Management
The module introduces operations as a functional area of management and helps the student understand the link with other functional areas of the firm. Participants will learn about the acquisition and allocation of resources to support the production and delivery of goods and services. Both manufacturing and service sectors are covered in the module. Topics covered include: Understanding the context and challenges of operations management, contemporary issues in operations management, total quality management, lean production management, Just-in-time approaches and business process re-engineering, case studies.

References:
Pycraft, M., et al, Operations Management, Pearson Education South Africa, 9th edition, 2007

International Marketing
The course focuses on the alignment of the firm’s international marketing strategy and its information technology strategy in order to maximize its Organizational Learning and Knowledge Management abilities at the global level. Topics addressed include : the scope and challenges of international marketing, information technology as enabler of successful international marketing, the international business environment, the impact of culture on international marketing, assessing international market opportunities, developing international marketing strategies, the role of information systems and technology in successful international marketing.

References:
Hollensen, S., Global Marketing: A Market-Responsive Approach, Prentice-Hall, 1998 (or later edition)
Cundiff, E.W., and Hilger, M.T., Marketing in the International Environment, Prentice-Hall, 1988 (or later edition).

Market Oriented Leadership
The course is an in-depth, integrative study of selected topics in leadership. These include: negotiation and conflict management, human resources policies and procedures, project management and performance measurement. Upon successful completion of the course, the student will be able to: present theories of negotiation and conflict management, compare and contrast human resources policies, define, initiate, and implement a plan for project management, initiate, implement, and evaluate a plan for performance management, apply appropriate written and oral skills, technology and ethical leadership skills in organizational settings.

References:
Northhouse, P.G., Introduction to Leadership: Concepts and Practice, Sage Publications, 2009.
Northhouse, P.G., leadership: Theory and Practice, 4th edition, sage Publications, 2008.

International Business Law
The course provides an overview of the most important treaties and laws (e.g. antitrust), including both US and Europe. It gives an insight into the main international contract law issues, basics and relevant issues for international managers. Gives an overview of corporate laws, discusses different types of legal entities and their establishment Other themes address include: the basics of contract, Product liability, transport regulations, competition issues, specific contracts for software, patent and know how; Main features of employment contracts and related HR issues, and the establishment of company subsidiaries in different geographical regions of the world.

References:
August, R., International Business Law, 5th edition, Pearson/Prentice-Hall, 2008.

E-Business
Electronic commerce and supporting technologies are evolving at such rapid pace that it is difficult to comprehend the basic principles fuelling this revolution. As a result, many managers are unclear on how their companies can survive and thrive in this new global cyber-environment. Recently, a number of business ventures and some transformations of traditional processes have been shedding more light on best practices, possibilities, and opportunities in e-business and electronic trading. The course will introduce participants to the recent developments in this field thus providing them with an in-depth understanding of the business opportunities as well as the strategic and management issues that companies face in the e-world. More specifically, the course will analyze the impact of electronic commerce on business and marketplace transformation in the global market environment.

References:
Jzckson, P., et al (eds), e-Business Fundamentals, Routledge, London & N.Y, 2003

Project Management
Objectives of the Course
The course is aimed at introducing students to the project management culture as a new paradigm for getting organized in the organization. Topics to be covered include the following:

– Project definition: A social construct
– Project planning, identification, detailed delivery, action and closing
– Uncertainty and complexity in project management
– Effective team characteristics
– Managing project teams
– Project team conflict and pitfalls
– Project leadership, structure and communication strategy

References
– Charvat, J., Project Management Methodologies, John Wiley, N.Y., 2003
– Hill, G.M., The Complete Project Management methodology and Tool Kit, Auerbach, London, 2009.

Strategic Management
The basic principle and practice of Strategic Management are addressed in this course. The focus is on the firm, its industry and competitive environment, its long-term direction and strategy, its resources and capabilities, and its prospects for success. The basic concepts and tools of strategic analysis are presented in an integrated approach and applied to real business context. Topics covered include: the concept of corporate strategy, industry analysis, firm analysis, the nature and sources of competitive advantage, corporate strategy, global strategies and the multinational corporation.

Learning goals

  • To develop the knowledge and skills necessary to effectively formulate and implement strategy;
  • To develop strategic thinking by equiping the students with the concepts, models and tools of strategic analysis;
  • To apply the concepts of strategic analysis in complex business environments through.developing the communication, problem solving and presentation skills of the student
  • To have a deeper understanding of the current business environment characterising the beginning of 21st century

References
– Eisenhardt and Sull (2001) Strategy as Simple Rules
– Montgomery (2008) Putting Leadership Back into Strategy
– Collis and Montgomery (2008) Competing on Resources
– Porter (1996) What is Strategy?

International Business
This course focuses on an overview of international business, foreign investment, trade and globalization. Topics include global economies, the role of technological and cultural factors in conducting global business, the multinational enterprises (MNE) and their key management issues.
Even though this course draws on several different academic disciplines including economics, international economics, strategic management, the goal is always to draw out the implications for firms.

Learning goals
The principal goal of this course for students is to learn how to analyse the economic, technological, management issues that affect firms’ foreign direct investments (FDI) and strategies in the global business environment.

Learning objectives
The objectives of this course are the following:

  • to deepen an understanding of the concepts of international business, global industry and external environment surrounding the multinational enterprises;
  • to analyse corporate situations from a global, cross-functional perspective: diagnosis of competitive and industry environments, organisational structure and operations, strategic resources, strength of strategic positioning, cultural factors;
  • to give guidelines to follow in presenting a case analysis;
  • to improve the student’s analytical, presentation and team-building skills (students must register for the course in groups usually 3-4).

References
– Hill C. W.L, International Business, Competing in the Global Marketplace, 7th edition, Illinois: Irwin, McGraw-Hill, 2008.
– Dunning J.H., Lundan S.M., Multinational Enterprises and the Global Economy, 2nd edition, Edward Cheltenham: Elgar Publishing Ltd, 2008.

Financial Reporting
In this course you will be introduced to, and gain an in-depth understanding of, the latest standards of accounting analysis and reporting methods as they apply in a global market environment. The course is delivered through a carefully judged blend of practice, theory and case-based learning. Six core modules provide a through grounding in the field of international, organizational finance including subject matter that covers all current trends and issues in the subject. The following six core modules will be covered in the course: Managerial Accounting, Intermediate Accounting, Cost Accounting,

Learning Goals

  • Introduce to the students financial management theories, terminology, concepts, problem-solving and techniques used in modern accounting and finance
  • Enable students have a clear understanding of financial statements, capital budgeting, working capital management, long-term debts, and capital funding.
  • Provide students with the analytical tools and techniques used in financial accounting as applied to complex business situations.
  • The course addresses contemporary issues in management accounting, financial management and organisational control
  • Financial controls in internet-based firms and management accounting in the digital economy
    Performance measurement and incentive systems

References
These include:
A Bhimani, Management Accounting in the Digital Economy, OUP (2003); Contemporary Issues in Management Accounting, OUP (2006); O Olson, J Guthrie & C Humphrey (Eds), Global Warning: Debating International Developments in New Public Financial Management, Cappelan Akademisk Forlag As, Oslo (1998); K Merchant & W Van der Stede, Management Control Systems: Performance Measurement, Evaluation and Incentives, FT/Prentice Hall (2007).

Advanced IT for Management
The aim of this course is to provide an overview of managing an IT project from start to end. IT projects are famously long, expensive and difficult to manage. The risks of either failure or not meeting the original expectations are high, particularly when the project stakeholders are not computer literates. By the end of this course, without turning into IT consultants, the students should be able to handle an IT project, with particular insights in the analysis phase and contract negotiation (especially its usual pitfalls), for any medium to large IT project. The course shall cover the following topics:

– Specificities of the IT project lifecycle
– Collaboration in IT System analysis
– Understanding and controlling the design phase
– Cost optimisation of IT projects
– Contract negotiation with IT companies

References
LAUDON, K.C. and LAUDON, J.P., Management Information Systems: Managing the Digital Firm, Person (11th edition), N.Y. 2009.

Information and Business Strategy
The course examines the current techniques and practice of effective use of information systems in an organization and its impact on business strategy in the global marketplace. Analysis of emerging technologies with application to business processes is thoroughly examined. The course also examines the role of management in effectively implementing an information systems strategy in the organization. The course reviews the range and impact of information systems and technology organizations use in designing and implementing their global business strategies. Integration of information systems with business strategy, personnel, and organizational considerations are all addressed in the course. At the end of the course the student should be able to effectively utilize modern information systems and technology in designing and implementing a global business strategy for the organization.

References
Hill, C.W. & Jones, G.R., Essentials of Strategic Management, Houghton-Mifflin, N.Y., 2008

Innovation and Change Management
Managers must have a deep understanding of how innovation works, and how people interact with changed circumstances. Implementation of new ideas, new strategies and new technology is one of the most complex of any organization’s tasks. This course introduces the student to the perspective of innovation and change in global business. It highlights the tools and techniques necessary to ensure success when bringing new processes and different strategies into an organization operating in the international business environment.

References
Senior, S., Organizational Change, 4th edition, Prentice-Hall, 2010.

Global Supply Chain Management
The course addresses the strategic aspects of supply chain management with a particular focus on the global business environment. Topics covered include: approaches to strategic management, relationship between corporate strategy and purchasing and supply chain management strategy, strategic management of quality and materials flow, strategic management of costs and added value, strategic management of supplier relationships, developments in strategic purchasing and supply chain management practices in global business.

References
Simchi-Levi, D., et al, Designing and Managing the Supply Chain: Concepts, Strategies, and Test Studies, 3rd edition, Mcgraw-Hill, N.Y., 2007
Chopra, S. & Meinal, P., Supply Chain Management, 3rd edition, Pearson, Prentice hall, N.Y., 2006

Total Quality Management
The course examines the concept of Total Quality Management (TQM) in the modern organization and assesses the role of information technology in effectively implementing a TQM strategy in the global market. The aim is to familiarize the student with quality philosophy, techniques and application in a modern enterprise. Topics covered include: fundamentals of TQM, customer-oriented product development, quality management systems. The student will be able to learn the various tools of TQM such as quality functions development, cost effective design, cost of quality, Keizen, process management, ISO 9001:2000, etc.. Throughout the course lectures will be supplemented by up-to-date case materials from organizations.

References
Evans, J.R. & Lindsay, W.M., The Management and Control of Quality, South-Western, Thompson Learning, 2002 (or latest edition)
Besterfield, D.H., Quality Control, 6th edition, Prentice-Hall, 2001(or latest edition)

Global Business Financing Techniques
The course addresses the different techniques used by corporations in raising capital for international business activities. For a great many businesses that operate across national boundaries capital is raised through a combination of different methods. These include the issue and distribution of share market capitalization (i.e. the total value of shares issued by a corporation) which is achieved through a variety of stocks, often identified as common, preferred, dual, and treasury stocks. International business financing is also achieved through the derivatives market and investment banking. By the end of the course the student will become thoroughly familiar with these and other technique organizations often use in financing international business ventures.

References
Desai, M.A., International Finance: A Casebook, John Wiley & Sons, 2006

Global Marketing Research
Dramatic changes in the global business environment coupled with technological advances in data collection, analysis and dissemination are having a profound effect on marketing research. The focus of this course is to enable the student become familiar with the tools and techniques of how to conduct market research in the international business environment. The course will enable the student develop the necessary skills as a market researcher operating across cultural boundaries. By the end of the course the student should be able to: understand how to develop and implement a global marketing research; understand the challenges in conducting market research in the international business environment; make some marketing decisions based on collected and analyzed data; be thoroughly familiar with the different tools and techniques used in analyzing data and information gathered in a global market research.

References
Malhotra, N., Marketing Research: An Applied Orientation, 6th edition, Prentice-hall, 2006

Entrepreneurship in the Global Market
This course allows students to understand the process of turning an idea into a business reality. It will focus on the execution of the entrepreneurial process. Students will learn to explore ideas and the value of picking a practical winning idea and how to make effective presentations to capture investor interests. The process will include building partners, employees and investors and how to manage the growth of the business. Product and service development through operations and marketing efforts will be examined. Techniques to manage the budget to allow for this process will be covered as well. This module will highlight practical applications in the context of today’s dynamic and turbulent business world. Focus will be on how new business ideas are developed and implemented, stimulated by the opportunities and challenges brought about by globalization, liberalization and technology. The understanding of the entrepreneurial process requires a change in paradigm that looks into the changing rules of competition giving rise to new and contemporary business models. Discussions will include related ethical, international and legal issues on how to fundamentally start a viable business.

References
Kuratko, D.F. & Hodgetts, R.M., Entrepreneurship, 7th edition, Thompson, South-Western, 2007
Hisrich, R.D. & Peters, M.P., Entrepreneurship, 5th edition, McGraw-Hill, Irwin, 2002

Global Information and B2B Marketing
The core of a successful business-to-business (B-to-B) marketing operation is an understanding of what constitutes value to the customer, creating and delivering that value and managing relations with both suppliers and end customers. The course examines B-to-B marketing from the perspective of global business including e-enabled aspects of these activities. Specifically, the course shall address issues related to B2B marketing strategy and planning, organizations as customers, strategic analysis of industry and markets, market and marketing research and intelligence, selecting a business market and managing the business product portfolio. All of these issues will be addressed with a view to establishing a sustainable competitive advantage for the organization increasingly impacted by the forces of globalization.

References
Blythe, J., and Zimmerman, A., Business to Business Marketing Management: A Global Perspective, Thompson Learning, 2005.

Managing People in the Information Age
The key to successful leadership in any organization involves managing people. And with the increasing globalization of markets coupled with the advent of modern information technology successful managing of human resources (HR) becomes the key to success. Successful HR management involves a variety of activities such as: deciding on your staff needs, how to fill these positions within budget, recruiting, orienting and training employees, and ensuring they perform well. HR management also includes managing employee benefits and compensation, employee records, legal issues and relations with unions. All of these issues will be addressed in this course within the overall context of the global market.

References
– Dowl, P.J. et al, International Human Resource Management: Managing people in a multinational context, South-Wertern College – 2004
– Nkomo, S.M. et al, Human Resource Management Applications: Cases, Exercises, Incidents and Skill Builders, Thomson Learning – 1999

Innovation and Technology Management
The course addresses fundamental issues in the management of information technology. Students will learn how to identify, acquire and implement new information technology to sustain an organization’s competitive strategy. Participants will also learn how to plan IT options to address important competitive needs of the organization. Other themes covered in the course include: market driven and technology driven product development, risk management, successful leadership models, effective IT management techniques and styles, team approaches to problem solving, competitive analysis and distribution strategies in the global market place.

References
Burgelman, R.A. & Maidique, M.A., Strategic Management of Technology and Innovation, Irwin, 1988

Global Corporate Finance I
This course is designed to allow students to gain a fundamental and sound understanding of the primary sources of finance and the workings of the capital market and the implications of various funding and investment appraisal techniques in managerial decision-making. This will in turn allow students to demonstrate the various techniques of financial analysis and foreign exchange management.

Learning Outcomes
Upon successful completion of this module, students will be able to:
– Describe both long and short-term sources of finance
– Describe the workings of the capital market
– Apply utility and portfolio theory and the capital asset pricing model
– Recognize and apply financial ratios in credit and risk management
– Describe and apply the effects of gearing on the capital structure of companies using arguments of Modigliani and Miller.
– Describe possible conflicts of interests between shareholders and bond holders
– Describe how the use of cross-section analysis of accounting data, inter-firm and inter-industry – comparisons and the management of foreign exchange.
– Describe the strategic importance of forensic accounting and good corporate governance.

Reference:
Shapiro, A.C. and Balbirer, S.D., Modern Corporate Finance, Prentice-Hall, 2009

Global Corporate Finance II
This advanced course in corporate finance includes capital budgeting, cost funds and capital structure valuation. Topics addressed in the course include the following:
Leasing
Mergers and acquisitions
Takeovers
Business failure
Re-organization
Acquisition

A combination of problem-solving and case study methodologies will be used to illustrate theories and techniques helpful in financial analysis and planning. The course examines advanced financial concepts.

References
Brigham, E.F. & Ehrhardt, M.C., Financial Management, Theory and Practice, South-Western Publishers, 2005.

Global Investments
This course is aimed at enabling students understand and master what a good international investment environment entails, what agencies are working at it, including OECD, World bank, IMF and others, and how they do it. While achieving this objective, the course will help students get familiar with concepts involved and try to develop analytical skills. Thus they will find out how international investments became global in a shift that became key to business success today.
Session topics:
Introduction: investment for development
The global institutional context
Corporate responsibility/governance: OECD investment instruments
Competition law and policy
Fighting corruption and fraud on financial markets
Private sector development: IFC and MIGA, pension funds and sovereign funds

References
Solnik, B. & McLeavey, D.W., Global investments, The Addison-Wesley P

Financial Statements Analysis
To give students the ability to read, interpret and understand the underlying information contained in financial statements.
By the end of the course the student should be able to examine the financial statements of a company using the analysis tools learned on the course and be able to have a good understanding of the company’s financial and general management as well as being able to judge its performance.
Session topics:
The course will cover in detail the components of income statement, cash flow and the balance sheet. Topics covered include the following:

Introduction: The Accounts
The Income Statement
The Balance Sheet
The Cash Flow statement
Notes to the Accounts

References
McKenzie, W., Using and Interpreting Company Accounts, Financial Times Books, London, 2007 .

Global Investments and Portfolio Management
This is an introductory course to Portfolio Management. After an introduction to financial
markets, instruments, trading of securities and the mutual fund industry, the course proposes a
detailed presentation of the “modern portfolio theory”. Topics covered include the following:

Efficient diversification
Efficient market hypothesis and the trade-off between risk and expected return as
Behavioral critiques of theories based on investor rationality
Security analysis and valuation:
Equity and debt securities
Derivative assets.

References
Bodie, Kane, and Marcus, Essentials of Investments, 7/e (2008)
ISBN: 0073405175

Financial Risk Management
This course will enable students understand and use the principles of Financial Risk Management as a tool for operating in everyday business environment. By the end of the course the student will be able to have a good understanding of Risk Management and its impact on a company’s daily activity. The course will cover the different types of risk, how to measure these, mitigate and make decisions in full knowledge of their possible consequences.
Lecture sessions will cover the following:
Introduction to a general understanding of financial risk
Risk Identification
Strategies for reducing company risk
Protecting the balance sheet components
Protecting operating assets

References:
Pickford, J, Mastering Risk Concepts Volume 1, Financial Times Books, London, ISBN 978-0-273-653379-0

Entrepreneurship in the Global Market
This course allows students to understand the process of turning an idea into a business reality. It will focus on the execution of the entrepreneurial process. Students will learn to explore ideas and the value of picking a practical winning idea and how to make effective presentations to capture investor interests. The process will include building partners, employees and investors and how to manage the growth of the business. Product and service development through operations and marketing efforts will be examined. Techniques to manage the budget to allow for this process will be covered as well. This module will highlight practical applications in the context of today’s dynamic and turbulent business world. Focus will be on how new business ideas are developed and implemented, stimulated by the opportunities and challenges brought about by globalization, liberalization and technology. The understanding of the entrepreneurial process requires a change in paradigm that looks into the changing rules of competition giving rise to new and contemporary business models. Discussions will include related ethical, international and legal issues on how to fundamentally start a viable business.

References:
Kuratko, D.F. & Hodgetts, R.M., Entrepreneurship, 7th edition, Thompson, South-Western, 2007
Hisrich, R.D. & Peters, M.P., Entrepreneurship, 5th edition, McGraw-Hill, Irwin, 2002

Global Information and B2B Marketing
The core of a successful business-to-business (B-to-B) marketing operation is an understanding of what constitutes value to the customer, creating and delivering that value and managing relations with both suppliers and end customers. The course examines B-to-B marketing from the perspective of global business including e-enabled aspects of these activities. Specifically, the course shall address issues related to B2B marketing strategy and planning, organizations as customers, strategic analysis of industry and markets, market and marketing research and intelligence, selecting a business market and managing the business product portfolio. All of these issues will be addressed with a view to establishing a sustainable competitive advantage for the organization increasingly impacted by the forces of globalization.

References
Blythe, J., and Zimmerman, A., Business to Business Marketing Management: A Global Perspective, Thompson learning, 2005.

Managing People in the Information Age
The key to successful leadership in any organization involves managing people. And with the increasing globalization of markets coupled with the advent of modern information technology successful managing of human resources (HR) becomes the key to success. Successful HR management involves a variety of activities such as: deciding on your staff needs, how to fill these positions within budget, recruiting, orienting and training employees, and ensuring they perform well. HR management also includes managing employee benefits and compensation, employee records, legal issues and relations with unions. All of these issues will be addressed in this course within the overall context of the global market.

References
– Dowl, P.J. et al, International Human Resource Management: Managing people in a multinational context, South-Wertern College – 2004
– Nkomo, S.M. et al, Human Resource Management Applications: Cases, Exercises, Incidents and Skill Builders, Thomson Learning – 1999.

Innovation and Technology Management
The course addresses fundamental issues in the management of information technology. Students will learn how to identify, acquire and implement new information technology to sustain an organization’s competitive strategy. Participants will also learn how to plan IT options to address important competitive needs of the organization. Other themes covered in the course include: market driven and technology driven product development, risk management, successful leadership models, effective IT management techniques and styles, team approaches to problem solving, competitive analysis and distribution strategies in the global market place.

References
Burgelman, R.A. & Maidique, M.A., Strategic Management of Technology and Innovation, Irwin, 1988.